Wednesday, March 4, 2015

Shamrock Count & Write Treasure Hunt


As it turns out, treasure hunts are a favorite of BOTH my sons. Our youngest (5 years old) is working on counting, recognizing and associating numerals, and writing numbers. All of those skills are combined in this easy treasure hunt. 


You decide the prize - ours was 10 extra minutes of electronic time (our boys have to earn their time each day so this was a REAL treat).

What You Need
The 6-page PDF of shamrock cards (download mine here)
Cardstock
Tape

Prep
Cut the cards apart and fold them on the dotted line so one side has the shamrocks and the other shows the ready-to-write numerals. Secure shut with glue or tape. The numeral 5 is the starting card. You'll notice that it is the only card that need not be folded. (Note: The cards do not go in numerical order.)

Take all the folded cards and tape them up around the room with the shamrocks facing out.

Play
To start the game, give your child the numeral 5 card and ask that they use the prompts to write it. Start at the suns. End with the moons.

"What number is that?"

"Five."

"Good. Now find the card with FIVE shamrocks."

When they've counted and confirmed they've found the card, have them turn over the card and write the numeral on the back. They'll then search for the card with that number of shamrocks. Play continues until they find the 8-shamrock card to finish.


Note: The six and nine numerals can be easily confused in this game. Remind kids that the red line is the top and the solid blue line is the bottom.

This game was loads of fun! If you want to play over and over, simply cut the cards apart so you can mix and match the front and backs. Laminate and use dry-erase markers so they can be reused again.

Happy numbers hunting!

Monday, March 2, 2015

After School Linky (3-2)


Welcome to the party!


There is so many fun holidays and celebrations coming up. It's great to see how all the linky participants have been combining fun and learning around Dr. Suess' birthday, St. Patrick's Day, Chinese New Year, Black History Month, etc.

Here are just a few of the great activities and ideas shared last year.

 Rainbow Paper at The Science Kiddo

 Dr. Suess Word Family Hats at This Reading Mama





Math Fact Islands at Creative Family Fun


The After School Linky is cohosted by
Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational

We would love to have you link up your School-Age Post (Ages 5 and up) about your learning week after school including Crafts, Activities, Playtime and Adventures that you are doing to enrich your children's lives after their day at school, home school, or on the weekend!

When linking up, please take a moment to comment on at least one post linked up before yours and grab our after school button to include a link on your post or site! By linking up, you're giving permission for us to share on our After School Pinterest Board and feature an image on our After School Party in the upcoming weeks!



Wednesday, February 25, 2015

The Ball that Defied Gravity ... or Did it? (Science Experiment)



Even very young kids understand gravity. So when a science experiment seems to defy it, they're mega impressed.


This fun activity wowed my boys. Okay, okay, okay … it kinda wowed me too.

What You Need
Ping-pong ball
2 unsharpened pencils
deck of cards
small book

What to DoKids should separate the deck of cards into two equal piles. Put the piles side-by-side so they're touching.

Take the pencils (eraser end)  and place them on the card piles. The tips of the erasers should almost be touching and as they angle down to the table top, should open up to an inch or slightly larger. Note: We used round pencils. I'd recommend you use traditional pencils (is that a hexagon?).


Ask your child to predict what will happen when the ball is placed at the top (eraser side) of the pencils. They'll tell you the ball will roll down the pencils. They're right.

Now separate the decks of cards and flip the pencils around, so the eraser tips are resting on the table and they open up so the unsharpened ends are resting on the card decks.


Place a small book over the eraser ends to weight them down and hold them in place.
Ask your child what will happen when you place the ball about an inch above the erasers. Will it roll back down and hit the book? They'll say yes, because gravity pulls things down, right?


Now put the ball in place and be astonished. The ball appears to roll up the pencil ramp, defying gravity.

How it Works
While it seems as if the ball defies gravity, truthfully, it doesn't. As the pencils spread apart, the ball slips between them, being pulled by the force of gravity toward the table. It just so happens that the pencils are angled up and so that's the direction the ball rolls as it drops down.

This great activity came from a truly phenomenal book. Smart Science Tricks is packed with simple experiments that seem like magic and use materials you most likely have around your house already. Check it out!

Monday, February 23, 2015

After School Linky (2-23)


Welcome to the party!

Looking for inspiration? Look no further!

Here are some of my favorite ideas from last week's link-up. Enjoy!



Green Eggs and Ham Day at Finding the Teachable Moments






The After School Linky is cohosted by
Relentlessly Fun, Deceptively Educational

We would love to have you link up your School-Age Post (Ages 5 and up) about your learning week after school including Crafts, Activities, Playtime and Adventures that you are doing to enrich your children's lives after their day at school, home school, or on the weekend!

When linking up, please take a moment to comment on at least one post linked up before yours and grab our after school button to include a link on your post or site! By linking up, you're giving permission for us to share on our After School Pinterest Board and feature an image on our After School Party in the upcoming weeks!


Friday, February 20, 2015

Roll and Make Whole (Adding Fractions Board Game)


My son's fourth grade class has been revisiting fractions lately. I thought I'd test my son's knowledge a bit and make a fun board game.


Roll and Make Whole practices two skills:
1. Reducing fractions to their lowest terms (i.e. simplifying fractions).
2. Adding fractions (sometimes with different denominators) to equal one.

It didn't take long for my son to catch on to our game and even though I won (which almost NEVER EVER happens) he was a good sport and hours later was still talking about the fractions.

Supplies
3 pages heavyweight cardstock
Different game pieces, one for each player (we used oversized buttons in two different colors)
Scissors (to cut out the die)
Hot glue (to hold the die together)
Tape (to tape the game board together)



How to Play
All players put their game pieces on the start square. The youngest player rolls first. Whatever fraction is revealed on the top of the die when it stops moving, is one part of a fraction addition problem. For example, if the player rolls a 2/5, they must ask themselves, "what fraction do I need to add to 2/5 to make one whole?"

They'll then look at the board and find the first occurrence of either 3/5 or another fraction that can be reduced to 3/5 (e.g. 6/10 or 9/15).


Their game piece will then be moved to that square. If a player rolls LOSE A TURN, their game piece remains in its place and an opponent gets to roll and move. If a player rolls ROLL AGAIN, they must do as the die says.

When players near the end, they must roll 2/3 to win, as 3/9 is the final square on the board. The first player to arrive at the finish wins.
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